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More Hiflex DIY Putty Tips & Tricks

 

 How much putty to use:

When you're new to molding, it's hard to know how much putty to use. What I like to do is picture how much clay I'd use to make the item I'm molding, then use 2-3 times that much putty. In other words, if the button I'm molding would take about 1 teaspoon of clay to make, I'll probably use 2-3 teaspoons (combined) of the mold putty mixture. Of course, you may like thicker molds, so as always, play around and figure out what works for you.

 What to do if you mix too much putty:

Once you've mixed the two mold putty parts together, you have to use it (no putting it back in the container). To avoid wasting putty, keep a few extra buttons handy, and mold those with any leftover mixture.

 What to do if you didn't mix enough putty:

If you've worked quickly and still have some time before the putty gets too firm to take an impression, measure out some more putty and add it in. Apply extra pressure as you're rolling it into a ball, and beware of creases. If the putty's already starting to firm up, it's probably best to go ahead and let it set. Then use more mold putty to "patch" the weak or incomplete areas, letting the whole thing set again before using it.

 Mold-baking techniques:

I mentioned previously that Amazing Mold Putty is oven-safe. While I haven't found that to be a huge advantage for normal clay use, it does create some interesting options for liquid clay. Try tinting some liquid clay with alcohol inks and putting a small amount in the mold's impressions. Fill the rest with "normal" clay for a neat effect.

 More mold putty uses:

Hiflex DIY Putty is Food / Medical Grade, so you could also use it for things like candy & jello molds.

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How Silicone Mold Putties Work

The basics are the same regardless of the brand. When you purchase these products, you get two different colors of putty in separate containers. To use them, you mix the two colors together until they're blended, then you shape the combination over the item you want to make a mold of. Once the mold putty is set (setting time varies by brand), you peel it off whatever you molded, and it's ready to use. At this point, you can use the mold just like you would any of the commercially available clay molds.

One advantage of the silicone molds over commercial molds is that you don't need a release agent. The clay pops right out of the silicone. In fact, I've occasionally run into problems with the clay sticking to my fingers more than to the mold -- a little corn starch or talcum powder sprinkled on top of the molded piece helps with that. Another advantage of silicone molds that I've seen touted -- and that may be useful to some of you -- is that many brands are oven-safe at polymer clay temperatures. This means you could bake your clay right in the mold. Of course, if you're like me & like to tweak your molded things before baking, this may not be a big benefit to you.

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How to Make Your Own Molds with Hiflex DIY Putty

 Making a Mold

 1. Measure and mix equal amounts:

Mix equal amounts of the different-colored putties together until they're a uniform (not marbled) color. If you're using Hiflex DIY Putty, don't stress too much about getting precisely the same amount of each color. Just roll out balls of putty that look roughly the same size.

 2. Roll into Ball:

Roll the putty mixture between your hands to eliminate creases. In my experience, applying pressure to really compress the putty ball helps here, especially if you're nearing the end of the putty's workable time.

 3. Mold and Set:

Shape the putty over whatever you're molding, pressing down completely to get a good impression. If it works better for the item you're molding, you can also put the mold putty on wax paper (it sticks to regular paper!) and press the item into it. If you're molding something large and flat (like for texture sheets), you can even run your mold putty through the pasta machine first to get a thin sheet. If you find you've mixed up more putty than you need for your item, quickly roll the excess into a ball and find something else to mold. And you do have to work fairly quickly: depending on conditions, 5 minutes is about as much good molding time as you'll have.

After you're done molding, let it sit undisturbed, according to the package directions (Hiflex DIY Putty sets in 25-35 minutes).

 4. Tweak and Use your Mold:

Once it's set, your mold is ready to use as is -- or you can tweak it some more. The mold putty will stick to itself, so if you happened to get a thin spot in your mold, you can patch it with more putty and allow it to set again. You can also cut the mold with scissors or a craft knife -- which is really handy for cleaning up edges on texture sheet molds. To use the mold, roll your polymer clay into a ball, eliminating all creases. Press it into the mold, then use an aluminum scraper to trim off any extra clay, leaving the back of the clay even with the top of the mold. (You can also use a clay knife to do this, but be careful not to cut the mold!) Gently press the clay out of the mold, then make any necessary modifications before baking. If you have a thin, flat mold, you can use a brayer to press it into a clay sheet -- or you can even run the mold and clay sheet through the pasta machine together.


 Ideas for Molds

You can make molds of anything.

Here's a few ideas to get you started:

 Jar of Buttons:

Want to make handmade polymer clay buttons to match some wonderful fabric? (Or to replace a missing button?) A button mold is a great way to keep all your buttons the same size and shape. Button molds are also a fun way to practice your molding skills -- grab that big jar o' buttons and start playing.

 Textures:

Make your own texture plates by finding interesting textures and making molds from them. Try baskets, lace, leaves -- or anything else that's got a great texture. You could also use extruded clay to make interesting patterns on a sheet of clay, then create a texture sheet from that.

 Handmade Items:

Once you get the hang of making your own molds, you'll really appreciate what a wonderful tool molds can be. Did you create one earring & want to make sure the other matches it perfectly? Make a mold! Want to mass-produce a favorite handmade polymer clay creation? Molds are a great way to speed up the process.

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Dental Implant Placement Options

A dental implant is an artificial tooth root that a periodontist places into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge. Dental implants are an ideal option for people in good general oral health who have lost a tooth or teeth due to periodontal disease, an injury, or some other reason. Dental implants are so natural-looking and feeling, you may forget you ever lost a tooth.

Under proper conditions, such as placement by a periodontist and diligent patient maintenance, implants can last a lifetime. Dental implants are intimately connected with the gum tissues and underlying bone in the mouth. Since periodontists are the dental experts who specialize in precisely these areas, they are ideal members of your dental implant team. Not only do periodontists have experience working with other dental professionals, they also have the special knowledge, training and facilities that you need to have teeth that look and feel just like your own.

Your periodontist and dentist will consult with you to determine where and how your implant should be placed. Depending on your specific condition and the type of implant chosen, your periodontist will create a treatment plan tailored to meet your needs.

Replacing a Single Tooth

If you are missing a single tooth, one implant and a crown can replace it. A dental implant replaces both the lost natural tooth and its root.

What are the advantages of a single-tooth implant over a bridge?
A dental implant provides several advantages over other tooth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like a natural tooth, a dental implant replaces a single tooth without sacrificing the health of neighboring teeth. The other common treatment for the loss of a single tooth, a tooth-supported fixed bridge, requires that adjacent teeth be ground down to support the cemented bridge.

Because a dental implant will replace your tooth root, the bone is better preserved. With a bridge, some of the bone that previously surrounded the tooth begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, a single implant can be more esthetic and easier to keep clean than a bridge. Gums can recede around a bridge, leaving a visible defect when the metal base or collar of the bridge becomes exposed. Resorbed bone beneath the bridge can lead to an unattractive smile. And, the cement holding the bridge in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay the teeth that anchor the bridge.

How will the implant be placed?
First, the implant, which looks like a screw or cylinder, is placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implant and the bone are allowed to bond together to form an anchor for your artificial tooth. During this time, a temporary tooth replacement option can be worn over the implant site.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implant and attach an extension. This small metal post, called an abutment, completes the foundation on which your new tooth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Finally, a replacement tooth called a crown will be created for you by your dentist and attached to the abutment. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak. Dental implants are so natural-looking and feeling, you may forget you ever lost a tooth.

Replacing Several Teeth

If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported bridges over fixed bridgesor removable partial dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported bridges replace teeth without support from adjacent natural teeth. Other common treatments for the loss of several teeth, such as fixed bridges or removable partial dentures, are dependent on support from adjacent teeth.

In addition, because implant-supported bridges will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth root may begin to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants are esthetic, functional and comfortable. Gums and bone can recede around a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, leaving a visible defect. Resorbed bone beneath bridges or removable partial dentures can lead to a collapsed, unattractive smile. The cement holding bridges in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay teeth that anchor the bridge. In addition, removable partial dentures can move around in the mouth and reduce your ability to eat certain foods.

How will the implants be placed?
First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal posts, called abutments, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Finally, replacement teeth, or bridges, will be created for you by your dentist and attached to the abutments. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

Replacing All of Your Teeth

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity.

In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures make it difficult to eat certain foods.

How will the implants be placed?
First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Then, over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal posts, called abutments, along with various connecting devices that allow multiple crowns to attach to the implants, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Depending upon the number of implants placed, the connecting device that will hold your new teeth can be tightened down on the implant, or it may be a clipped to a bar or a round ball anchor to which a denture snaps on and off.

Finally, full bridges or full dentures will be created for you and attached to your implants or the connecting device. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

Sinus Augmentation

A key to implant success is the quantity and quality of the bone where the implant is to be placed. The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. If you've lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place implants.

Sinus augmentation can help correct this problem by raising the sinus floor and developing bone for the placement of dental implants. Several techniques can be used to raise the sinus and allow for new bone to form. In one common technique, an incision is made to expose the bone. Then a small circle is cut into the bone. This bony piece is lifted into the sinus cavity, much like a trap door, and the space underneath is filled with bone graft material. Your periodontist can explain your options for graft materials, which can regenerate lost bone and tissue.

Finally, the incision is closed and healing is allowed to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone usually will be allowed to develop for about four to 12 months before implants can be placed. After the implants are placed, an additional healing period is required. In some cases, the implant can be placed at the same time the sinus is augmented.

Sinus augmentation has been shown to greatly increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. Many patients experience minimal discomfort during this procedure.

Ridge Modification

Deformities in the upper or lower jaw can leave you with inadequate bone in which to place dental implants. This defect may have been caused by periodontal disease, wearing dentures, developmental defects, injury or trauma. Not only does this deformity cause problems in placing the implant, it can also cause an unattractive indentation in the jaw line near the missing teeth that may be difficult to clean and maintain.

To correct the problem, the gum is lifted away from the ridge to expose the bony defect. The defect is then filled with bone or bone substitute to build up the ridge. Your periodontist can tell you about your options for graft materials, which can help to regenerate lost bone and tissue.

Finally, the incision is closed and healing is allowed to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone usually will be allowed to develop for about four to 12 months before implants can be placed. In some cases, the implant can be placed at the same time the ridge is modified.

Ridge modification has been shown to greatly improve appearance and increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. Ridge modification can enhance your restorative success both esthetically and functionally.

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Dental Partial Vs. Bridges

When a patient is missing teeth, three options are available to fill the voids. A partial denture is a removable option, and dental implants and bridges are fixed placements.

    Partial Dentures

  1. While appropriate for back teeth, a removable partial denture can be uncomfortable and inconvenient. Though the cost is lower, partial dentures can be misplaced, and will often need adjustments to fit properly.
  2. Bridge

  3. A bridge requires two crown placements onto healthy teeth with "pontics" (fake crowns) in between, bonded to the two crowns to replace missing teeth. It's a fixed alternative to removable partial dentures. While a bridge is aesthetically pleasing, the cost is higher and it requires daily maintenance.
  4. Partial Denture Warning

  5. Partial dentures are never ideal for anterior teeth placement. Partial dentures usually require wires to wrap around existing teeth for support, and can be uncomfortable to wear. The fit can also change due to changes in gums or bone structure.
  6. Bridge Warnings

  7. While the permanent nature of bridges is highly desirable, a water pick and floss must be used for maintenance. Additionally, the bridge requires that two teeth (that may be otherwise healthy) need to be grinded down and prepared for crown placement.
  8. The Other Option

  9. When a missing tooth needs to be replaced, and neither the denture nor bridge option appeals to the patient, a dental implant may be the solution. Not all bone structures can accommodate implants. Consult your dentist to determine your eligibility.

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Dental Bridges: Pros & Cons

A dental bridge is unlike a full set of dentures. It does not replace a full set of natural teeth and is fixed in place. As with other dental products, a dental bridge has pros and cons.

    Significance

  1. The dental bridge fills empty space where your natural teeth were.
  2. Function

  3. If you decide to have a dental bridge, you will have a crown attached to your natural teeth on each end of the bridge to keep the false tooth or teeth in place.
  4. Pros

  5. A dental bridge will restore the appearance of a full set of teeth, so you can smile without worrying about people noticing your missing tooth or teeth. In addition, you can have your dental bridge within two visits, according to Dental Health magazine.
  6. Disadvantages

  7. After the dental procedure, your teeth can undergo changes. For example, you can have extreme sensitivity to cold or hot temperatures. Also, a dental procedure can be expesive. According to Dental Health magazine, the cost can be $250-500 to attach the bridge and up to $1200 per false tooth.
  8. Considerations

  9. With good oral hygiene, a dental bridge can last over 10 years. However, without proper hygiene a bridge will not last long. In fact, it can become infected without necessary care.

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Dental Implant Procedure: Advantages and Success Rate

Dental Implant Procedure: Advantages and Success Rate

Dental implants are artificial tooth replacements used to counter tooth loss. The procedure is categorized as a form of prosthetic (artificial replacement) dentistry, though it also falls into the category of cosmetic dentistry as well.

Although you have a number of restorative options for the treatment of missing teeth, none have proven to be as functionally effective and durable as implants. In many cases, dental implants may be the only logical choice for the restoration of all necessary functionality of the teeth and supporting structures.

Tooth Loss

Teeth are lost because of:

  • Tooth decay
  • Root canal failure
  • Gum disease (Periodontitis)
  • Trauma to the mouth
  • Excessive wear and tear
  • Congenital defects

People who have lost teeth might feel too self-conscious to smile or talk. Additionally, biting irregularities caused by tooth loss can have a negative effect on eating habits and this can lead to secondary health problems like malnutrition. Regardless of the nature of problems related to tooth loss, dental implants may provide a simple remedy with proven results.

Advantages of Implant Dentistry

Dental implants are stronger and more durable than their restorative counterparts (bridges anddentures). Implants offer a permanent solution to tooth loss. Additionally, implants may be used in conjunction with other restorative procedures for maximum effectiveness. For example, a single implant can serve to support a crown replacing a single missing tooth. Implants can also be used to support a dental bridge for the replacement of multiple missing teeth, and can be used with dentures to increase stability and reduce gum tissue irritation.

Procedural advancements, including the development of narrower “mini” implants, mean that more people than ever before are finding themselves candidates for implantation. However, candidacy for implantation still varies, meaning that your dentist may determine that you should opt for an alternative restoration. Keep in mind, too, that dentists do not need a specific license by law in order to perform implant dentistry. A general or restorative dentist may perform the crown and bridge placement that is associated with implant restoration. However, prosthodontists are the specialists who often complete this crucial procedure.

Periodontists and oral surgeons perform the implant surgical procedure itself.

The Dental Implant Procedure

Today's dental implants are virtually indistinguishable from other teeth. This appearance is aided in part by the structural and functional connection between the dental implant and the living bone. Implants are typically placed in a single sitting but require a period of osseointegration.

Osseointegration is the process by which direct anchorage of a dental implant root and the bone of the jaw occurs. Osseointegrated implants are the most commonly used and successful type of dental implant. An osseointegrated implant takes anywhere from three to six months to anchor and heal, at which point your dentist can complete the procedure with the placement of a crown. Once the implant has anchored with the jawbone, artificial prosthesis may be attached and the process is done. If osseointegration does not occur, the implant will fail.

Detailed procedural steps are as follows:

Preparing the Jaw for Implantation: A dental implant is commonly composed of a titanium material screw and a crown. A small-diameter hole (pilot hole) is drilled at edentulous (where there is no tooth) jaw sites in order to guide the titanium screw that holds a dental implant in place. To avoid damaging vital jaw and face structures like the inferior alveolar nerve in the mandible (lower jaw), a dentist must use great skill and expertise when boring the pilot hole and sizing the jaw bone.

Placement of the Implant: After the initial pilot hole has been drilled into the appropriate jaw site, it is slowly widened to allow for placement of the implant screw. Following this placement, a protective cover screw is placed on top to allow the implant site to heal and the dental implant to anchor (osseointegration). After several months, the protective cover is removed and a temporary crown is placed on top of the dental implant. The temporary crown serves as a template around which the gum grows and shapes itself in a natural way. The process is completed when the temporary crown is replaced with a permanent crown.

Success Rates of Dental Implants

Dental implants are among the most successful procedures in dentistry. There is no guarantee that an implant procedure will be successful, but studies have shown a five-year success rate of 95 percent for lower jaw implants and 90 percent for upper jaw implants. The success rate for upper jaw implants is slightly lower because the upper jaw (especially the posterior section) is less dense than the lower jaw, making successful implantation and osseointegration potentially more difficult to achieve. Lower posterior implantation has the highest success rate for all dental implants.

Dental implants may fail for a number of reasons. The cause is often related to a failure in the osseointegration process. For example, if the implant is placed in a poor position, osseointegration may not take place. Dental implants may break or become infected (like natural teeth) and crowns may become loose.

If you are a smoker who is considering a dental implant, your dentist will likely advise you to give up smoking before undergoing the process because smokers face a higher risk of implant failure. Since the procedure can be extremely expensive, you risk wasting your money on dental implants if you do not give up the habit.

On the plus side, dental implants are not susceptible to the formation of cavities; still, poor oral hygiene can lead to the development of peri-implantitis around dental implants. This disease is tantamount to the development of periodontitis (severe gum disease) around a natural tooth.

Implant Dentistry: New Procedural Strategies

Dentists trained to perform implants, crowns and/or surgery have begun to use a new strategy for the replacement of missing teeth. Dental implants are placed into locations where teeth have recently been extracted. When successful, this new strategy can shed months off of the treatment time associated with dental implants because osseointegration is sped up. Candidacy for this type of early intervention is dependent upon anatomical factors of the extracted tooth site. For example, in many cases the extracted tooth site is wider than the implant, making it impossible to place the implant into the site immediately after extraction. Dental work would have to be performed first in order to create a perfect fit for the implant.

Another strategy for implant placement within narrow spaces is the incorporation of the mini-implant. Mini-implants may be used for small teeth and incisors. Learn more about alternatives to traditional implants by checking out our information on mini implants. 

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Dental Bridges

Do You Need a Bridge?
Like other things, teeth need each other for support. When one tooth is lost, the biting force changes on the teeth next to the space, and they begin to shift. When a tooth no longer has anything to chew against, it begins to extrude out of the socket. You can eventually end up losing the tooth.

Alternatives to dental Bridges
When you're missing one or more teeth, you have several options:   Delay treatment,Implants, Partial denture, Space maintainer, and Bridge. Delaying treatment is the least desirable option. Things will only get worse.

Placing a Three-Unit Bridge on Front Teeth
It takes two appointments to replace a missing front tooth with a three-unit bridge. That's because a bridge is custom-crafted in a dental laboratory to precisely fit your teeth. To make the entire procedure comfortable for you, the first thing your dentist will do is make sure you're thoroughly numb.

All-Porcelain Dental Bridges
New breakthroughs in adhesives and stronger porcelain materials now make it possible to create bridges entirely from porcelain. All-porcelain bridges maintain a translucency that makes them difficult to tell from real teeth.

Post-Op Instructions: After Receiving a Crown or Bridge
On rare occasions, temporary crowns come off. Call your dentist if this happens, and keep the temporary so it can be re-cemented. It's very important for the proper fit of your final restoration that temporaries stay in place. It's normal to experience some sensitivity to heat, cold and pressure after each appointment.

Caring for Your Dental Bridge
A dental bridge depends on the health of the adjacent teeth and gums for support. To care for your bridge, brush and floss normally after each meal.

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Dental Bridges

  1. It's your first visit to your new dentist and as you fill out the endless paperwork, you come across the infamous dental question: "What would you change about your smile?" If you are missing any teeth, your answer is almost certainly going to be, "Everything." 

    While one of the most popular treatments for tooth loss is a dental bridge, alternative treatments exist that are not only less expensive but more convenient. The choice you make regarding your smile is all yours, you simply need to decide what the best choice is for you.
  2. Space Maintainers

  3. Maintainers are generally an alternative for a child before his permanent tooth is ready to come in or who has lost a permanent tooth due to a fall or accident. The maintainer ensures his remaining teeth will not shift, resulting in further dental problems. 

    The most common type of space maintainer used is removable, made of stainless steel or plastic, and resembles a retainer. Impressions are made of the child's mouth before the maintainer is custom made by his dentist or orthodontist. 

    If the maintainer is required due to premature loss of a baby tooth, his dentist will take x-rays periodically to track the progress of his permanent tooth. Just before it comes through, use of the maintainer is discontinued. However, if your child needs the maintainer due to the loss of a permanent tooth, he may need to continue wearing it until his growth process is complete, typically between the ages of 16 and 18. At this time he will be given another option such as implants, partial dentures or dental bridges.
  4. Cast Framework Partial Dentures

  5. Of all the alternatives to dental bridges, partial dentures are the least expensive. They not only fill in the gap between one or more teeth, they also act as a spacer, preventing the rest of your permanent teeth from shifting. 

    Cast framework partials are much less noticeable than partials which are made from acrylic, and the framework is strong. In addition, the metal rests on your teeth rather than your tissue, reducing sore spots which are a common problem with partial dentures. 

    When you first receive your partials, you may feel awkward and find it difficult to speak or eat. Learning to insert and remove them may take some time as well. However, after a few weeks, you will begin adjusting to them. You may also need to wear them continuously in the beginning; this will help your dentist determine if they need to be adjusted to fit your mouth more comfortably. Once all the adjustments are made, you should be able to remove them at night and replace them in the morning.
  6. Implants

  7. Implants may be more durable than bridges, and offer a permanent solution to tooth loss. They have a 90 percent success rate when used as a replacement for the bottom teeth, and a 95 percent success rate when used as a replacement for the upper. 

    Made of titanium material and screws, your dentist begins by drilling a hole in the space where the implant is needed. This space is then slowly widened which allows for the placement of the implant screw. Once the implant screw is placed in its designated area, your dentist will place a protective cover over it while it heals; this takes between three and six months. 

    The process is complete once the protective cover is removed and a crown takes its place. Though a lengthy procedure, it is one of the most successful procedures in dentistry.

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More about Dental Crowns

Dental Crown

A dental crown or dental cap is a custom made restoration that covers a tooth with sustained significant loss of structure. They are analogical to being a thimble capped over your finger. Dental crowns are used to restore teeth to a certain shape and size. They provide strength and improves the appearance of the tooth. 

Benefits of Dental Crowns

• Protects severely damaged tooth or tooth weakened by decay, fracture, large fillings or root canal therapy from fracturing. Teeth with large fillings tend to "flex more" forcing the tooth apart possibily causing stress fractures 
• Holds together cracked or weaken teeth and seal the tooth from decay 
• Covers discolored and irregularities in teeth in improving cosmetic appearance 
• Helps preserve the natural function and position of the teeth 
• Restores tooth with large decay, cavities or filings 
• Supports the replacement teeth in a bridge 
• Restores and maintains natural bite 
• Covers a dental implant 
• Restore your smile 

Types of Dental Crowns

There are three basic types of materials for dental crowns:
1. Porcelain fused to metal (PFM) dental crowns 
2. All porcelain dental crowns 
3. All metal dental crowns (Gold) 
Porcelain fused to metal (PFM) dental crowns and all porcelain crowns are tooth colored crowns. PFM dental crowns offer the best combination of aesthetics and durability. PFM dental crowns are usually used to restore back teeth where the forces of chewing and grinding are strongest. All porcelain crowns are the most aesthetic and are used primarily used for front teeth where the need for strength is not as critical. Gold dental crowns are the most durable and offer the most precise fit. Gold dental crowns does not chip.
The all-ceramic porcelain crowns used at Bangkok International Dental Center include the IPS Empress Esthetics crowns from Ivoclar Vivadent and Procera NobelEsthetics from Nobel Biocare.

Procedure for Dental Crowns Treatment

The course of treatment described here is one of several options available at our dental clinic. Consult your dentist to find out what the best solution is for you, given your specific condition. 
1. First evaluation and crowns tooth preparation 
o Local anesthesia is first adminstered at the region for crown tooth preparation 
o The natural tooth is reshaped to receive the new dental crown 
o Records are taken and approved with the patient to determine the color, bite, length and shape of the crown 
o An impressionis taken for a replica model of the teeth 
o This model is sent to a lab where the individual personal crown is fabricated 
o A temporary crown is placed on whilst the permanent crown is made 
2. Fitting of crowns on delivery 
o The temporary crown is removed 
o The permanent crown is fitted and cemented into place on the teeth 
o A quality assurance check is done for any re-adjustments or re-works of the dental crowns 
3. Care of crowns 
o Brush and floss the crowns as recommended by your dentist or dental hygienist. 

Dental Crown Recovery Expectations

Both the preparation and placement of the temporary bridge as well as the bonding of the permanent bridge may cause some minor tenderness in the area. Some individuals may experience sensitivity in teeth. This sensitivity will disappear gradually over a few days to weeks. 

Postcare Instructions for Dental Crowns 

1. Avoid chewing on or eating hard foods on the restorations for 24 hours from the time they were cemented 
2. To help with discomfort or swelling rinse your mouth 3xd with warm salt water. (1tsp. of salt in 8oz of water) 
3. Keep crown area clean to maintain tissue compatibility (the contour of the prosthesis must allow the surrounding tissue to conform to a natural, healthy position) 
4. Some sensitivity in teeth may be experienced by certain patients. This sensitivity will disappear gradually over a few days to weeks. If teeth are sensitive 
o Avoid hot, cold or acidic food and beverages 
o Pain medication be taken as directed as long as there is no medical contradiction based upon your medical history 
o Use flouride rinse and toothpaste for sensivity teeth 
o Clean teeth properly

Care for Dental Crowns

Dental crowns require the same regular and consistent home and professional dental care, as your natural teeth to prevent decay at the tooth-dental crown junction. To provide optimum longevity for your restorations, please follow the home care tips below: 
1. Brush after eating and before bedtime around the crown with a soft toothbrush, especially where the crown meets the gum line. At the gum line harmful bacteria can be harbored to cause decay and gum disease. 
2. Floss at least once to twice a day. Use the proxy brush or floss threader to remove plaque under and around these areas to maintain good oral hygiene. Buildup of food debris and plaque on your teeth and gums can become infected. 
3. Rinse with fluoride rinse before bed. Swish the fluoride rinse vigorously in your mouth for at least one minute. Do not swallow any of the rinse and do not eat or drink anything for 30 minutes 
4. Be careful about chewing toffees, gum, grainy rolls and tough food in this area 
5. See your dentist for regular professional check-ups and cleanings

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